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Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
community, chicagos very own jeffery breslow working hard to change that one step at a time. 68 year-old sculptor jeffery breslow led a charmed life >> very lucky all of my life my family my career many many thanks part of this is giving back >> success as an award winning it toy maker for 41 years and not accomplished sculptor has allowed jeffery breslow to give back considerably pappa what i was doing sculptures university of chicago children's hospital i did a fundraiser to raise money for the new hospital >> older brother diagnosed with bladder cancer is found out a good friend also stricken with the disease decided writing a check was not enough >> my brother gets back in a way that i have not been able, he bork's troubles gives time i have always given back by writing a check >> august 2nd jeffery breslow is killed a hiker wilhite pete 272 mi. long trail in vermont to raise money for bladder cancer advocacy >> a tremendous amount of work on believable the preparation collector, to get ready to spend almost one month on the trail the preparation for the food and all of the
. >> it good afternoon, supervisors. i work with jefferies natural pet foods in the castro district. we have two stores. i wanted to speak a little bit about our experiences to what makes a small pet food store different from a big box chain and how we can serve our customers in different ways and how we would like to be able to continue doing this despite large corporate competition. we knew dogs that come in by name and we the people who come in by name. we know it may have special needs and allergies, we know when they need certain products ordered for them. we also deliver. we do a lot for our customers. most of that is to create a community atmosphere that is a neighborhood by neighborhood and that does contribute to the uniqueness of all of san francisco. i hope you consider that an thank you very much for your time. >> good afternoon, supervisors. i also work for jefferies natural pet food and by work at both locations. i come from a background of retail where have worked for big box stores. i have worked for both home depot and petsmart. one of the things that stood out in my memory
for jefferies natural pet food and by work at both locations. i come from a background of retail where have worked for big box stores. i have worked for both home depot and petsmart. one of the things that stood out in my memory is that at monthly store meetings, where we would hook up across the nation with other stores, one of the ways we closed each meeting was counting down how many mom-and- pop stores we close down each month. that has always stood out in my mind. while i have been living in san francisco and i took a job with jefferies, the one thing that was tantamount to my mind is that we were part of the community and we know most of our customers by name. we know their animals and we know their needs and we know each other. we are part of each other's community. that's something i would hate to see us lose by allowing the big boxes to command. thank you. >> good afternoon, supervisors. i am the owner of a natural pet food store in two locations and about to open a huge manufacturing facility in san francisco and i would like to encourage the legislation so we can keep our stores
. >> geraldo, it's the body language experts more than we could ask for jeffery ash son rubber faced platform for casey anthony on death row for killing her daughter. >> on that morning casey knew she would not be staying at that house. neither would caylee. she knew that that night she would be in the arms of her boyfriend and that caylee would be dead. >> after ashton's powerful case this morning in front of the court. >> after that light hearted exchange baez had a strange request to judge perry regarding his opponent. >> i apologize but i continue to see mr. ashtashton's facial expressions as i am doing my closing arguments and i would ask that he refrain from showing gestures or something whether he apros or disapproves what i am saying. >> concerned were subtle cues to the jury baez complained and the judge reacted. >> i can't see mr. ashton but as i have made it quite plain and clear we don't need any facial expressions of approving disapproving or anything else. >> as b baez presented his own powerful closing statements ashton seemed to struggle to control his emotions. then in midstr
to stop taking it. it is a fascinating situation. we have jeffery tubin with us. we have been talking about this in the past. the judge says this is in the hands of his doctors, primarily. how does it work? can prison doctors hold loughner down and force this medication into him? >> the defense has one goal. to keep him from getting executed. that is the only goal. at the moment, he has been found not fit to stand trial. as long as you are not fit to stand trial, you are not getting executed. the status quo is pretty satisfactory to the defense. the problem here is that the medical authorities are trying to get loughner better. they are giving him drugs. they are treating him the way any severely mentally ill patient would be treated. that may get him sane enough for trial and thus, excuse. the defense is trying to keep the status quo and not get him cured so he doesn't get executed. >> jeff, thank you. for the psychological aspect of the story, we turn to jeff gardier. he has been following the story. jeff, let me start with your expertise on this. what is wrong with loughner? what m
afternoon, supervisors. i work with jefferies natural pet foods in the castro district. we have two stores.
with jefferies, the one thing that was tantamount to my mind is that we were part of the community and we know most of our customers by name. we know their animals and we know their needs and we know each other. we are part of each other's community. that's something i would hate to see us lose by allowing the big boxes to command. thank you. >> good afternoon, supervisors. i am the owner of a natural pet food store in two locations and about to open a huge manufacturing facility in san francisco and i would like to encourage the legislation so we can keep our stores going and keep the small pet stores going. we all have a special relationship and we cater to everyone in the bay area. we deliver five days a week and there's no reason we could not help any customer that could not get to a store. thank you. >> good afternoon, supervisors. a month ago, we opened a pet store -- a little background -- since we're building a pet store, i was in management and decided to pursue my dream of owning a small store. in our research to open a pet store in our neighborhood coppola we researched all the stor
on signs of weakening global demand. trader jeffery grossman thinks crude could drop $10 a barrel, eventually making its way to the gas pump. >> usually the consumer only gets a fraction of what comes off. honestly, i can see the market coming down 25 to 30 cents over the course of the summer without any problem. >> reporter: however, linda rayfield, oil analyst with platts, says the calendar points to higher prices. >> you should start to see a pick up in demand. traditionally you see that throughout the third quarter. then it really starts to get stronger at the onset of the fourth quarter, because what you will get is the tail end of driving season. with household budgets already stretched, even people with cheap commutes are paying close attention to prices. >> i have really started to think about gas prices when thinking about vacation. i'm going to be going on a road trip very soon and i've actually decided to fly one leg of the journey. >> reporter: but today his $5 fill-up is not earning much sympathy. erika miller, "nightly business report," new york. >> susie: here's wha
to tell the truth or not if will be noted attorney jeffery m. leving. >> you say you have an agreement with jose baez. is this actually a done deal? >> we have verbally agreed. he wants to see the money. we are bringing it down this week. if anybody else takes the deal from us we have breech of contract. like leonard padilla i don't speak out of my backside. we have the money leonard. >> where is the money coming from? >> it will be from unnamed investors. i am taking the hit putting my name out there. i originally made the $1 million offer. they plan running to the hills like a little girl when the world got out. private elevate terror productions and i have private investors that will remain nameless. i am going to put my name out there because i am not afraid. this is america land of freedom. nothing wrong with making money on the story because it's capitalism. if you have a problem with capitalism move to socialist. >> the question i have is who is going to sponsor this? who is going to air it? >> we are selling the interviews overseas all of our markets overseas. there is not goin
to help. three detectives drove him around the city and turned into jeffery mathis's neighborhood. >> as soon as we went down the street, everybody stopped. i was like, what's going on. everything is stopped. they said, laughingly, that's because we have a honky in the car. >> john glover, who took over as fbi chief in atlanta that summer said that's why he and hazelwood decided the killer had to be black. >> the killer is someone who is invisible in the black community and who is invisible in the black community than another black person. >> welcome harris was one of the first task force detectives. he knew it had to be someone who went unnoticed. >> we felt like it was somebody who could come in the neighborhood and get these children and not draw attention to themselves. >> the question of which race struck a raw nerve. it had been only a dozen years since the murder of dr. martin luther king. on the surface, atlanta was a well-integrated city. beneath the surface, it remained separate and unequal. >> my prayer and the prayer of everybody in there was we wanted the person to be
empire. murdock landed in london. that's where we find jeffery kofman, good morning you to. >> good morning you to. this it, the final edition. "the end of the world," thank you and good-bye. nobody wanted to be associated with a tabloid that became tainted and toxic. let's be clear here, while the paper is dead, the scandal surrounding it is just beginning to unfold. for the world's most powerful media barren, rupert murdock who owns the wall street journal and foxnews, this may be the biggest crisis his empire has ever faced. it was not just another paper in the portfolio. it was the best selling paper in the english language. but today the tabloid that lived on scandal has died on a scandal of its own. >> obviously, they've done wrong. obviously, they have been caught doing wrong. >> reporter: and the final edition of "the news of the world" acknowledges that. we've demanded high standards write the editors inside. but as we are now only too painfully aware, some who worked for us, or in our name, fell shamefully short of those standards and quite simply we lost our wayay lost in
publication the "wall street journal." jeffery frankel was a member of economic advisers under president clinton. jeffrey did the numbers surprise you this morning. >> it's a bad number, a bad report, quite discouraging, over 18,000 jobs created overall which is not even enough to keep up with the population growth. jon: steve, all right, so, your take on why we got a number like that? >> well, you know, maybe the most discouraging number is that when you look at people who can't find a full time job and you've got an unemployment rate closer to 16%, or one out of six americans. i agree with professor frakel it was allows see report. i think the stimulus plan simply didn't work, you have the kind of overhang now, the after effects of the stimulus where we're not putting money into the economy any longer. you're starting to see the unemployment rate -- at this stage of a normal recovery we shoulding getting about 250,000 jobs a month. 18,000 is pretty pitiful. jon: we have asked our viewers for questions for you guys. here is one for you, jeffery, because it involves the clinton administr
of politics, editors, to get a story at all cost. abc's jeffery kofman joins us from london with more. >> christiane, this is the final issue "the news of the world." what was the biggest selling paper in the england language. inside no ads but filled with apologies. it is much more of the story of a mi demise of a paper. it's a scandal some compare to watergate, ultimately, the question is asked what does it moon for the murdock media empire. >> reporter: if "the news of the world" covered it own demise the headline would read -- tawdry tabloid die, no one cries. the paper's cause of death? self-inflicted by the reporters, editors and owner. media baron, rupert murdock. >> "the news of the world" was a criminal organization. for years "the news of the world" delighted and enraging, and embarrassing politician, celebrities and royals. by exposing their failings. the public loved it and sold 8 million copies each sunday, bringing in huge profits. for a decade, the paper ducked a nagging scandal about its news-gathering methods. this week, that changed. all because of this girl, her nam
an inquisition. for "this week" jeffery kofman abc news, london. >> and i want to bring in one of this country's foremost media critics, who reported on rue put murdo murdoch, ken auletta. thanks for joining us. >> my pleasure. >> this morning, we saw rebecca brooks arrested and les hinton resigned. is this going to be enough to stop this bleed? >> no, if you think about it, news corps made the claim that what we're talking about is a few rotten apples. what we see with the arrest of rebecca brooks today and resignation much mr. hinton yesterday, you have a rotten barrel problem. and i think there will be more arrests. think about it. no newspaper reporter in this world can go to an editor and say, i have the following scoop, without that editor saying, who is your source, how did you get that story? there's multiple editors involved in news of the world, and many have not been named or implicated. then you have the question, who paid tens of thousands of dollars to get stories from the police. that, by the way, is illegal, as is hacking into phones and presumably that's not a decision made by
of his "the news of the world" tabloid. driven to wind at all cost. abc's jeffery kofman joins us from london with more. >> christiane, this is the final issue "the news of the world." it's all come too late for a public that couldn't stand its sleaziness. this is much more than the demize of a newspaper. it's a scandal some compare to watergate, ultimately, the question is asked what does it moon for the murdock media empire. >> reporter: if "the news of the world" covered it own demise the headline would read -- self-inflicted by the reporters, editors anan owner. media barron, rupert murder dark. >> "the news of the world" was a criminal organization. for years "the news of the world" delighted and enraging, politics and royals. by exposing their failings. the public loved it and sold 8 million copies each sunday, bringing in huge profits. for a decade, the paper ducked a scandal about the news-gathering efforts. this week, though, that changed. all because of this girl, her name, milly doweler, in 2002, britain was riveted by the story of the 13-year-old's disappearance. nini davie
mirror, they tried to hack into the cell phones of 9/11 victims. apparently it didn't work. >> jeffery, thanks so much. >>> you know, we all know that driving while texting or talking on a cell phone is a dangerous con for mags. many still do it. is there any way to change behavior? abc's lisa stark has our exclusive report on a new study that shows the answer is yes. >> reporter: the evidence is clear. many of us are driven to distraction. where is this driver looking? not on the road ahead. she was texting. and this trucker. cell phone in one hand. suddenly he's careening across four lanes and rolling over. >> being stopped because of your cell phone use. >> reporter: what happened if police would crack down on distracted drivers in to find out department of transportation paid for perhaps in syracuse, new york. the results are in. >> we ended uppish shug over 9,000 citations for drivers. substantial change of behavior. >> reporter: in syracuse the numbers of users fell 57%. texting while driving plummeted 72%. >> the key is consistent, focus, dedicated enforcement. >> reporter: at a
jeffery daemer's rain of terror faces possible homicide charges harris faulkner has the story. >> reporter: this story stands out. this was what police said the one victim that broke open of jeffreyee damer case. just to bring everybody back to that, tracy edwards was scene running down the street naked outside of dahmer's home 20 years ago, and partially handcuffed near dahmer's apartment. police picked him up, traced him back to dahmer's apartment. they found body parts in his apartment, human remains. as the case unfolded and dahmer was found guilty of killing, raping and dismembering as many as 17 boys or men, this victim tracy williams was right there. they are saying that 52-year-old tracy edwards now is homeless and was seen with two other homeless men involved in an argument, when one of them fell into the milwaukee river from a bridge. this just happening. they are looking now at possible homicide charges against tracy edwards. the prosecutor's office there in millio milwaukee says they are reviewing the case with the homicide unit to see if he played any role in the death of the
there needs to pull their heads out and use some common sense and stuff spending that money. jeffery immelt is the jobs are, and he is taking jobs over to china. people, wake up, common sense, stops spending. gosh, it is terrible. host: from the "national review." by a margin of 76% to 19%, americans say that the u.s. economy is getting worse according to the gallup tracker. it is obama as the economy according to the commerce numbers, it is growing just 1.3%, maybe. senator tom coburn has been weighing in on this debate. he joined us last week on the "washington journal," and he had this to say yesterday. >> when we salt -- one we call something a cut of $900 billion, but still $832 billion more than by what we are spending now, that is not a cut anywhere except in washington. we ought to admit it. if that is the best we can do, the american people need to know that is the best we can do. but we cannot play the game anymore. host: yesterday on the senate floor. ben joins us from tennessee. caller: they should of had this all ironed out months ago. they're just playing games up there in was
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)